Science Rendue Possible

Braz, A. G., M. L. Lorini, and M. M. Vale. 2018. Climate change is likely to affect the distribution but not parapatry of the Brazilian marmoset monkeys ( Callithrix spp.) Y. Wiersma [ed.],. Diversity and Distributions 25: 536–550. https://doi.org/10.1111/ddi.12872

Aim: Parapatric distributional patterns can arise from abiotic or biotic factors, or from dispersal barriers. Climate change can potentially affect parapatry by changing species’ potential geographic distribution, and thereby widening or shrinking contact zones. Here, we study the effects of climate…

Antonelli, A., A. Zizka, F. A. Carvalho, R. Scharn, C. D. Bacon, D. Silvestro, and F. L. Condamine. 2018. Amazonia is the primary source of Neotropical biodiversity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115: 6034–6039. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1713819115

The American tropics (the Neotropics) are the most species-rich realm on Earth, and for centuries, scientists have attempted to understand the origins and evolution of their biodiversity. It is now clear that different regions and taxonomic groups have responded differently to geological and climati…

Faurby, S., and M. B. Araújo. 2018. Anthropogenic range contractions bias species climate change forecasts. Nature Climate Change 8: 252–256. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-018-0089-x

Forecasts of species range shifts under climate change most often rely on ecological niche models, in which characterizations of climate suitability are highly contingent on the species range data used. If ranges are far from equilibrium under current environmental conditions, for instance owing to …