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Covarrubias, S., Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, C., Rojas-Soto, O., Hernández-Guzmán, R., & González, C. (2021). Functional connectivity of an endemic tree frog in a highly threatened tropical dry forest in Mexico. Écoscience, 1–17. doi:10.1080/11956860.2021.1921935 https://doi.org/10.1080/11956860.2021.1921935

The increase in anthropogenic activities that lead to fragmentation and habitat loss, could result in a reduction of connectivity among habitat patches of terrestrial species. We used ecological niche models, circuit and graph theories to evaluate functional connectivity among home-range patches and…

Jin, W.-T., Gernandt, D. S., Wehenkel, C., Xia, X.-M., Wei, X.-X., & Wang, X.-Q. (2021). Phylogenomic and ecological analyses reveal the spatiotemporal evolution of global pines. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(20), e2022302118. doi:10.1073/pnas.2022302118 https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2022302118

How coniferous forests evolved in the Northern Hemisphere remains largely unknown. Unlike most groups of organisms that generally follow a latitudinal diversity gradient, most conifer species in the Northern Hemisphere are distributed in mountainous areas at middle latitudes. It is of great interest…

Wieringa, J. G., Carstens, B. C., & Gibbs, H. L. (2021). Predicting migration routes for three species of migratory bats using species distribution models. PeerJ, 9, e11177. doi:10.7717/peerj.11177 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.11177

Understanding seasonal variation in the distribution and movement patterns of migratory species is essential to monitoring and conservation efforts. While there are many species of migratory bats in North America, little is known about their seasonal movements. In terms of conservation, this is impo…

Inman, R., Franklin, J., Esque, T., & Nussear, K. (2021). Comparing sample bias correction methods for species distribution modeling using virtual species. Ecosphere, 12(3). doi:10.1002/ecs2.3422 https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.3422

A key assumption in species distribution modeling (SDM) with presence‐background (PB) methods is that sampling of occurrence localities is unbiased and that any sampling bias is proportional to the background distribution of environmental covariates. This assumption is rarely met when SDM practition…

Briscoe Runquist, R. D., Lake, T. A., & Moeller, D. A. (2021). Improving predictions of range expansion for invasive species using joint species distribution models and surrogate co‐occurring species. Journal of Biogeography. doi:10.1111/jbi.14105 https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.14105

Aims: Species distribution models (SDMs) are often used to forecast potential distributions of important invasive or rare species. However, situations where models could be the most valuable ecologically or economically, such as for predicting invasion risk, often pose the greatest challenges to SDM…

Zamora‐Gutiérrez, V., Rivera‐Villanueva, A. N., Martínez Balvanera, S., Castro‐Castro, A., & Aguirre‐Gutiérrez, J. (2021). Vulnerability of bat‐plant pollination interactions due to environmental change. Global Change Biology. doi:10.1111/gcb.15611 https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15611

Plant‐pollinator interactions are highly relevant to society as many crops important for humans are animal pollinated. However, changes in climate and land use may put such interacting patterns at risk by disrupting the occurrences between pollinators and the plants they pollinate. Here, we analyse …

Saldaña‐López, A., Vilà, M., Lloret, F., Manuel Herrera, J., & González‐Moreno, P. (2021). Assembly of species’ climatic niches of coastal communities does not shift after invasion. Journal of Vegetation Science, 32(2). doi:10.1111/jvs.12989 https://doi.org/10.1111/jvs.12989

Question: Do invasions by invasive plant species with contrasting trait profiles (Arctotheca calendula, Carpobrotus spp., Conyza bonariensis, and Opuntia dillenii) change the climatic niche of coastal plant communities? Location: Atlantic coastal habitats in Huelva (Spain). Methods: We identifi…

Ellestad, P., Forest, F., Serpe, M., Novak, S. J., & Buerki, S. (2021). Harnessing large-scale biodiversity data to infer the current distribution of Vanilla planifolia (Orchidaceae). Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society. doi:10.1093/botlinnean/boab005 https://doi.org/10.1093/botlinnean/boab005

Although vanilla is one of the most popular flavours in the world, there is still uncertainty concerning the native distribution of the species that produces it, Vanilla planifolia. To circumscribe the native geographical extent of this economically important species more precisely, we propose a new…

Allstädt, F. J., Koutsodendris, A., Appel, E., Rösler, W., Reichgelt, T., Kaboth-Bahr, S., … Pross, J. (2021). Late Pliocene to early Pleistocene climate dynamics in western North America based on a new pollen record from paleo-Lake Idaho. Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments. doi:10.1007/s12549-020-00460-1 https://doi.org/10.1007/s12549-020-00460-1

Marked by the expansion of ice sheets in the high latitudes, the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation across the Plio/Pleistocene transition at ~ 2.7 Ma represents a critical interval of late Neogene climate evolution. To date, the characteristics of climate change in North America duri…

Brendel, M. R., Schurr, F. M., & Sheppard, C. S. (2020). Inter‐ and intraspecific selection in alien plants: How population growth, functional traits and climate responses change with residence time. Global Ecology and Biogeography. doi:10.1111/geb.13228 https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.13228

Aim: When alien species are introduced to new ranges, climate or trait mismatches may initially constrain their population growth. However, inter‐ and intraspecific selection in the new environment should cause population growth rates to increase with residence time. Using a species‐for‐time approac…