Science Rendue Possible

Barrientos-Díaz, O., M. R. Báez-Lizarazo, F. Enderle, A. L. A. Segatto, M. Reginato, and A. C. Turchetto-Zolet. 2024. The Atlantic forest is a potentially climatic suitable habitat for four Neotropical Myrtaceae species through time. Ecological Informatics 80: 102490. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoinf.2024.102490

Myrtaceae is one of the most species-rich botanical families and is a critical floristic component in regions with high diversity, such as the Atlantic Forest and Cerrado. In the Neotropical region, Myrteae is the main tribe of Myrtaceae and includes the most diverse genera Eugenia, Myrcia, Psidium, Myrceugenia, and Campomanesia. Here, we investigated the climatic suitability selected Myrteae species - Campomanesia guazumifolia, C. xanthocarpa, Eugenia pyriformis, and Psidium cattleyanum - across South America. This study spans the present day, three historical periods, and two future climate change scenarios. Our modeling analysis (ENSEMBLE) included environmental variables applied at the times evaluated. Our results suggest that temperature seasonality and precipitation in the driest month were the variables that most influenced climate suitability in the species. The Atlantic Forest lato sensu is a potentially climate suitable habitat for these four species over time, which matches the center of diversification and richness of Myrtaceae, in regions where they coexist and share habitats sympatrically. Historical glaciation events have influenced the retraction and expansion of species distribution, ultimately contributing to their current coexistence in select neotropical ecoregions. Our projections for the future indicate climate suitable habitats in areas similar to present models despite the different effects of climate change. The Atlantic Forest is the key to maintaining Myrteae biodiversity over time. Therefore, it is necessary to combine other approaches (e.g., evolutionary, ecological, and genetic studies) to deeply understand the evolutionary history of this region, its protection, and the maintenance of the biodiversity it harbors.

Reichgelt, T., A. Baumgartner, R. Feng, and D. A. Willard. 2023. Poleward amplification, seasonal rainfall and forest heterogeneity in the Miocene of the eastern USA. Global and Planetary Change 222: 104073. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2023.104073

Paleoclimate reconstructions can provide a window into the environmental conditions in Earth history when atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations were higher than today. In the eastern USA, paleoclimate reconstructions are sparse, because terrestrial sedimentary deposits are rare. Despite this, the eastern USA has the largest population and population density in North America, and understanding the effects of current and future climate change is of vital importance. Here, we provide terrestrial paleoclimate reconstructions of the eastern USA from Miocene fossil floras. Additionally, we compare proxy paleoclimate reconstructions from the warmest period in the Miocene, the Miocene Climatic Optimum (MCO), to those of an MCO Earth System Model. Reconstructed Miocene temperatures and precipitation north of 35°N are higher than modern. In contrast, south of 35°N, temperatures and precipitation are similar to today, suggesting a poleward amplification effect in eastern North America. Reconstructed Miocene rainfall seasonality was predominantly higher than modern, regardless of latitude, indicating greater variability in intra-annual moisture transport. Reconstructed climates are almost uniformly in the temperate seasonal forest biome, but heterogeneity of specific forest types is evident. Reconstructed Miocene terrestrial temperatures from the eastern USA are lower than modeled temperatures and coeval Atlantic sea surface temperatures. However, reconstructed rainfall is consistent with modeled rainfall. Our results show that during the Miocene, climate was most different from modern in the northeastern states, and may suggest a drastic reduction in the meridional temperature gradient along the North American east coast compared to today.

Mbobo, T., D. M. Richardson, D. Gwynne-Evans, J. Deacon, and J. R. U. Wilson. 2022. Psidium cattleyanum (Myrtaceae) invasions in South Africa: Status and prognosis. South African Journal of Botany 150: 412–419. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sajb.2022.07.002

Psidium cattleyanum (Myrtaceae) is a widespread invasive species in several countries, particularly on oceanic islands. The species was first recorded in South Africa in 1948 and has since established self-sustaining populations. We present the first comprehensive evaluation of the invasiveness of P. cattleyanum in South Africa by: 1) mapping the current distribution of the species; 2) estimating its potential range using species distribution models in MaxEnt; 3) analysing the risk posed to South Africa using the risk analysis for alien taxa framework; and 4) developing recommendations for regulation. Psidium cattleyanum was recorded at 52 sites in four provinces across South Africa, with the population in the Western Cape being the first substantial invasive population reported from a temperate winter-rainfall region globally. Invasive populations were assessed in detail at four sites: Newlands Forest (Western Cape; n=2193 plants; covering ∼12 ha), Eshowe (KwaZulu-Natal; n=1561, ∼7.6 ha), Southbroom (KwaZulu-Natal; n = 449, ∼2.9 ha), and George (Western Cape; n=214, ∼2.4 ha). At all four sites the species is self-sustaining and there is evidence of spread. In South Africa, the east coast is climatically suitable for the species to expand its range. Although damaging invasions of P. cattleyanum have only been recorded on several islands to date, we find no reason to suggest that climatically suitable continental regions (including parts of South Africa) will not suffer harmful impacts if invasions progress unmanaged. As such, we support the current regulation of P. cattleyanum in South Africa, whereby the species must be controlled as part of a national management plan (category 1b) noting that while it is advisable to ban cultivation, the forcible removal of plants from people's gardens should perhaps only be prioritised if such plantings clearly pose a high risk (i.e., in climatically suitable regions near to riparian areas or natural areas).

Sotuyo, S., E. Pedraza-Ortega, E. Martínez-Salas, J. Linares, and L. Cabrera. 2022. Insights into phylogenetic divergence of Dalbergia (Leguminosae: Dalbergiae) from Mexico and Central America. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution 10. https://doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2022.910250

The pantropical genus Dalbergia includes more than 250 species. Phylogenetic studies of the group are scarce and have only included two or three species distributed in Mexico. We obtained herbarium samples of Mexican, Central American, and South American species (sourced from MEXU). In addition, sequences of GenBank accessions were used to complement the study. Using internal transcribed spacer (ITS), the matK and rbcL sequences from 384 accessions comprising species from America, Asia, and Africa were sampled to evaluate phylogenetic relationships of Mexican species and infrageneric classifications based on morphological data. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the genus Dalbergia is monophyletic and originated in South America. The species distributed in Mexico are not a monophyletic clade but are divided into four clades with affinities to South American and Asian species clades. There is no correlation between geography and large-scale phylogeny. The estimated ages of the Mexican and Central American clades ranged from 11.32 Ma (Dalbergia granadillo clade) to 1.88 Ma (Dalbergia ecastaphyllum clade). Multiple long-distance dispersal events should be used to explain the current genus distribution.

Rodrigues, A. V., G. Nakamura, V. G. Staggemeier, and L. Duarte. 2022. Species misidentification affects biodiversity metrics: Dealing with this issue using the new R package naturaList. Ecological Informatics 69: 101625. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoinf.2022.101625

Biodiversity databases are increasingly available and have fostered accelerated advances in many disciplines within ecology and evolution. However, the quality of the evidence generated depends critically on the quality of the input data, and species misidentifications are present in virtually any o…

Schley, R. J., M. Qin, M. Vatanparast, P. Malakasi, M. Estrella, G. P. Lewis, and B. B. Klitgård. 2022. Pantropical diversification of padauk trees and relatives was influenced by biome‐switching and long‐distance dispersal. Journal of Biogeography 49: 391–404. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.14310

Aim: Phenotypes promoting dispersal over ecological timescales may have macroevolutionary consequences, such as long-distance dispersal and diversification. However, whether dispersal traits explain the distribution of pantropical plant groups remains unclear. Here we reconstruct the biogeographical…

Xue, T., S. R. Gadagkar, T. P. Albright, X. Yang, J. Li, C. Xia, J. Wu, and S. Yu. 2021. Prioritizing conservation of biodiversity in an alpine region: Distribution pattern and conservation status of seed plants in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Global Ecology and Conservation 32: e01885. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gecco.2021.e01885

The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) harbors abundant and diverse plant life owing to its high habitat heterogeneity. However, the distribution pattern of biodiversity hotspots and their conservation status remain unclear. Based on 148,283 high-resolution occurrence coordinates of 13,450 seed plants, w…

Wang, C.-J., and J.-Z. Wan. 2021. Functional trait perspective on suitable habitat distribution of invasive plant species at a global scale. Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation 19: 475–486. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pecon.2021.07.002

Plant invasion has been proved to threaten biodiversity conservation and ecosystem maintenance at a global scale. It is a challenge to project suitable habitat distributions of invasive plant species (IPS) for invasion risk assessment at large spatial scales. Interaction outcomes between native and …

Yudaputra, A., I. A. Fijridiyanto, I. P. Astuti, R. N. Zulkarnaen, A. Yuswandi, J. R. Witono, and . Yuzammi. 2021. Geographic Distribution Shift of Invasive Plant Austroeupatorium inulifolium in the Future Climate Projection. Annual Research & Review in Biology: 38–47. https://doi.org/10.9734/arrb/2021/v36i530373

Aims: This study aims to predict the future geographic distribution shift of invasive plant species Austroeupathorium inulifolium as the impact of global climate change. Study Design: The rising temperature and precipitation change lead to the geographic distribution shift of organisms. A. inulifol…

Zizka, A., F. Antunes Carvalho, A. Calvente, M. Rocio Baez-Lizarazo, A. Cabral, J. F. R. Coelho, M. Colli-Silva, et al. 2020. No one-size-fits-all solution to clean GBIF. PeerJ 8: e9916. https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.9916

Species occurrence records provide the basis for many biodiversity studies. They derive from georeferenced specimens deposited in natural history collections and visual observations, such as those obtained through various mobile applications. Given the rapid increase in availability of such data, th…