Science Rendue Possible

Martín, G., Erinjery, J., Gumbs, R., Somaweera, R., Ediriweera, D., Diggle, P. J., … Murray, K. A. (2021). Integrating snake distribution, abundance and expert‐derived behavioural traits predicts snakebite risk. Journal of Applied Ecology. doi:10.1111/1365-2664.14081 https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.14081

Despite important implications for human health, distribution, abundance and behaviour of most medically relevant snakes remain poorly understood. Such data deficiencies hamper efforts to characterise the causal pathways of snakebite envenoming and to prioritise management options in the areas at gr…

Xian, Y., Lu, Y., & Liu, G. (2021). Is climate change threatening or beneficial to the habitat distribution of global pangolin species? Evidence from species distribution modeling. Science of The Total Environment, 151385. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.151385 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.151385

Global climate change caused by fossil energy consumption is strongly threatening the species diversity of mammals. In particular, changes in temperature and precipitation have affected the habitat of pangolins. Thus, we employed the MaxEnt modeling approach to simulate the potential habitat distrib…

McGowan, N. E., Roche, N., Aughney, T., Flanagan, J., Nolan, P., Marnell, F., & Reid, N. (2021). Testing consistency of modelled predictions of the impact of climate change on bats. Climate Change Ecology, 2, 100011. doi:10.1016/j.ecochg.2021.100011 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecochg.2021.100011

Species Distribution Models (SDMs) are a cornerstone of climate change conservation research but temporal extrapolations into future climate scenarios cannot be verified until later this century. One way of assessing the robustness of projections is to compare their consistency between different mod…

Wieringa, J. G., Carstens, B. C., & Gibbs, H. L. (2021). Predicting migration routes for three species of migratory bats using species distribution models. PeerJ, 9, e11177. doi:10.7717/peerj.11177 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.11177

Understanding seasonal variation in the distribution and movement patterns of migratory species is essential to monitoring and conservation efforts. While there are many species of migratory bats in North America, little is known about their seasonal movements. In terms of conservation, this is impo…

Buckingham, E., Curry, J., Emogor, C., Tomsett, L., & Cooper, N. (2021). Using natural history collections to investigate changes in pangolin (Pholidota: Manidae) geographic ranges through time. PeerJ, 9, e10843. doi:10.7717/peerj.10843 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.10843

Pangolins, often considered the world’s most trafficked wild mammals, have continued to experience rapid declines across Asia and Africa. All eight species are classed as either Vulnerable, Endangered or Critically Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. Alo…

Cooper, N., Bond, A. L., Davis, J. L., Portela Miguez, R., Tomsett, L., & Helgen, K. M. (2019). Sex biases in bird and mammal natural history collections. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 286(1913), 20192025. doi:10.1098/rspb.2019.2025 https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2019.2025

Natural history specimens are widely used across ecology, evolutionary biology and conservation. Although biological sex may influence all of these areas, it is often overlooked in large-scale studies using museum specimens. If collections are biased towards one sex, studies may not be representativ…

Zizka, A., Antonelli, A., & Silvestro, D. (2020). sampbias , a method for quantifying geographic sampling biases in species distribution data. Ecography. doi:10.1111/ecog.05102 https://doi.org/10.1111/ecog.05102

Geo‐referenced species occurrences from public databases have become essential to biodiversity research and conservation. However, geographical biases are widely recognized as a factor limiting the usefulness of such data for understanding species diversity and distribution. In particular, differenc…

Li, X., Li, B., Wang, G., Zhan, X., & Holyoak, M. (2020). Deeply digging the interaction effect in multiple linear regressions using a fractional-power interaction term. MethodsX, 7, 101067. doi:10.1016/j.mex.2020.101067 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mex.2020.101067

In multiple regression Y ~ β0 + β1X1 + β2X2 + β3X1 X2 + ɛ., the interaction term is quantified as the product of X1 and X2. We developed fractional-power interaction regression (FPIR), using βX1M X2N as the interaction term. The rationale of FPIR is that the slopes of Y-X1 regression along the X2 gr…

Cardador, L., & Blackburn, T. M. (2020). A global assessment of human influence on niche shifts and risk predictions of bird invasions. Global Ecology and Biogeography. doi:10.1111/geb.13166 https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.13166

Aim: Estimating the strength of niche conservatism is key for predictions of invasion risk. Most studies consider only the climatic niche, but other factors, such as human disturbance, also shape niches. Whether occupation of human habitats in the alien range depends on the native tolerances of spec…

Pili, A. N., Tingley, R., Sy, E. Y., Diesmos, M. L. L., & Diesmos, A. C. (2020). Niche shifts and environmental non-equilibrium undermine the usefulness of ecological niche models for invasion risk assessments. Scientific Reports, 10(1). doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64568-2 https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-64568-2

Niche shifts and environmental non-equilibrium in invading alien species undermine niche-based predictions of alien species’ potential distributions and, consequently, their usefulness for invasion risk assessments. Here, we compared the realized climatic niches of four alien amphibian species (Hyla…